What's for lunch?

They’re slimy and satisfying, according to a new 200-page report from the U.N. encouraging the world to eat more insects. The Food and Agriculture Organization, which released the report this week, says insect farming is “one of the many ways to address food and feed security.”

The report says insects leave a low environmental footprint and provide high-quality protein compared with meat and fish. Bonus: the nutritional value of red ants, small grasshoppers and some water beetles pack (gram-per-gram or ounce-per-ounce) enough protein to rank with lean ground beef, while having less fat per gram.

But are they tasty? The report noted that some caterpillars in southern Africa and weaver ant eggs in Southeast Asia are considered delicacies and command high prices.